WHAT IS A SUPERANNUATION “TPD” CLAIM?

By 4 August 2017General

You may be eligible for a Total and Permanent Disablement (“TPD”) benefit to be paid to you by your superannuation fund if you have suffered an injury or illness and are now unable to work.

“TPD” stands for Total and Permanent Disability or Disablement and each superannuation fund may define this term slightly differently.

However, generally speaking, to be successful in making a TPD claim, you must be able to show that due to an injury or illness you are unable to return to work in your usual occupation, or in any other employment for which you are reasonably suited based on your education, training and experience.

You can only make this claim with your superannuation fund if you hold the right insurance cover.  To determine whether you hold TPD insurance cover, you should check your annual Member Statement or contact your superannuation fund.  It is also possible for you to make more than one TPD claim if you have accounts with multiple super funds that have the appropriate insurance cover.

The claims process may be slightly different for each superannuation fund.  It normally involves completing claim forms and other documents for your fund, as well as obtaining medical support from two of your treating doctors.

If your claim is successful, you will be entitled to the payment of a lump sum.  The amount of this payment depends on the superannuation fund’s policy and your level of insurance cover.

It is important to be aware that withdrawing a TPD benefit from your superannuation account may impact on other benefits, such as WorkCover weekly payments and/or Centrelink payments.  We therefore recommend that you seek legal or financial advice either before commencing, or at least prior to finalising, a TPD claim.

If your claim is unsuccessful, there are appeal avenues available that allow you to dispute this decision.  After requesting the review of an adverse decision internally by the superfund, any rejection of a TPD claim can be referred to either the Superannuation Complaints Tribunal or to the Court. If you have received an adverse decision from your superannuation fund, we recommend you promptly seek legal advice, as time limits to appeal the decision will apply.